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May 23 '14
bluepueblo:

Glass Walled Library, Germany
photo via phillip

bluepueblo:

Glass Walled Library, Germany

photo via phillip

May 23 '14
kenobi-wan-obi:

How a Medieval Philosopher Dreamed Up the ‘Multiverse’

The idea that our universe may be just one among many out there has intrigued modern cosmologists for some time. But it looks like this “multiverse” concept might actually have appeared, albeit unintentionally, back in the Middle Ages.
When scientists analyzed a 13th-century Latin text and applied modern mathematics to it, they found hints that the English philosopher who wrote it in 1225 was already toying with concepts similar to the multiverse.
The study, published on the pre-print server Arxiv and accepted by the Proceedings of the Royal Society A, has brought together two traditionally quite separate subjects: cosmology and history.
"The results give us a much deeper appreciation of science in the 13th century," said one of the lead authors of the study, physicist Richard Bower of Durham University in the United Kingdom. "From a scientist’s perspective, I find I had previously completely underestimated the depth of logical argument in the Middle Ages."
The international team first translated the original Latin text — called De Luce, which means “On Light,” and written by a philosopher named Robert Grosseteste — into English.
Grosseteste was “one of the most dazzling minds of his generation, lauded by his successors as a mathematical genius, theologian, politician and church leader; he was the bishop of Lincoln from 1235-53,” said the principal investigator of the research, medieval historian Giles Gasper of Durham University.
The scientists then tried to understand what Grosseteste was aiming to explain, and wrote down his ideas as if they were modern mathematical equations. The team used a computer to solve these equations, and to see whether they explained the universe as Grosseteste imagined it.

kenobi-wan-obi:

How a Medieval Philosopher Dreamed Up the ‘Multiverse’

The idea that our universe may be just one among many out there has intrigued modern cosmologists for some time. But it looks like this “multiverse” concept might actually have appeared, albeit unintentionally, back in the Middle Ages.

When scientists analyzed a 13th-century Latin text and applied modern mathematics to it, they found hints that the English philosopher who wrote it in 1225 was already toying with concepts similar to the multiverse.

The study, published on the pre-print server Arxiv and accepted by the Proceedings of the Royal Society A, has brought together two traditionally quite separate subjects: cosmology and history.

"The results give us a much deeper appreciation of science in the 13th century," said one of the lead authors of the study, physicist Richard Bower of Durham University in the United Kingdom. "From a scientist’s perspective, I find I had previously completely underestimated the depth of logical argument in the Middle Ages."

The international team first translated the original Latin text — called De Luce, which means “On Light,” and written by a philosopher named Robert Grosseteste — into English.

Grosseteste was “one of the most dazzling minds of his generation, lauded by his successors as a mathematical genius, theologian, politician and church leader; he was the bishop of Lincoln from 1235-53,” said the principal investigator of the research, medieval historian Giles Gasper of Durham University.

The scientists then tried to understand what Grosseteste was aiming to explain, and wrote down his ideas as if they were modern mathematical equations. The team used a computer to solve these equations, and to see whether they explained the universe as Grosseteste imagined it.

(Source: afro-dominicano)

May 22 '14
bluepueblo:

Infinity Pool, Bali
photo via shelley

bluepueblo:

Infinity Pool, Bali

photo via shelley

May 22 '14
"All things considered, what we look for in other people is perhaps the same gentle deterritorialization we look for in travel. The temptation of exile in the desire of another and of journey across that desire come to be substituted for one’s own desire and for discovery. Often looks and amorous gestures already have the distance of exile, language expatriates itself into words which are afraid to mean, the body is like a hologram, gentle on the eye and soft to the touch, and can thus easily be striated in all directions by desire like an aerial space. We move circumspectly within our emotions, passing from one to another, on a mental planet made up of convolutions. And we bring back the same transparent memories from our excesses and passions as we do from our travels."
Jean Baudrillard (via seelenlos)

(Source: sirilaf)

May 22 '14

bookoisseur:

nudityandnerdery:

totalabandoneet:

procrastinatingasusual:

sosuperawesome:

Glow in the Dark Solar System Apparel by makeitgoodpdx

I have a mighty need

Want those undies.

If you wear the underwear, and someone doesn’t tell you that “your ass is out of this world,” just put your pants back on and leave, because that person doesn’t deserve to have sex with you.

TAKE MY MONEY

(Source: sosuperawesome)

May 22 '14
"Once something is added to your collection of beliefs, you protect it from harm. You do this instinctively and unconsciously when confronted with attitude-inconsistent information. Just as confirmation bias shields you when you actively seek information, the backfire effect defends you when the information seeks you, when it blindsides you. Coming or going, you stick to your beliefs instead of questioning them. When someone tries to correct you, tries to dilute your misconceptions, it backfires and strengthens those misconceptions instead. Over time, the backfire effect makes you less skeptical of those things that allow you to continue seeing your beliefs and attitudes as true and proper."
The psychology of the “backfire effect” and why it’s so hard for us to change our minds (via we-are-star-stuff)

(Source: explore-blog)

May 22 '14

treeporn:

Beautiful tree tattoos. (sources unknown).

update: first image on the bottom row is actually a pair of AMAZING leggings by Black Milk. Though they would make great tattoos too. (Thanks butt-t0uches)

update 2: The lady in the middle on the third row is the very beautiful wanderingeast.

May 22 '14

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Photographs and Watercolors Merge in Surreal Paintings by Aliza Razell

Using self-portrait photographs and watercolors, artist Aliza Razell has been exploring several abstract narratives by merging the two mediums in Photoshop. Her first series, Anesidora , involves the story of Pandora’s Jar (Pandora’s box was actually a jar, a detail misinterpreted in the 1400s), while the second is inspired by the Finnish word ikävä, meaning the feeling of missing someone or something. You can see much more of her work over on Flickr, and you might interested to know Razell is the older sister of young photgorapher Fiddle Oak, featured here last year.

Apr 1 '14
"They have no shallow vanity. They do not care for such false diamonds as knowing celebrities … listening to the raptures of a stray spectator in a picture show, being renowned in the taverns … If they do a pennyworth they do not strut about as though they had done a hundred roubles’ worth, and do not brag of having the entry where others are not admitted … The truly talented always keep in obscurity among the crowd, as far as possible from advertisement … Even Krylov has said that an empty barrel echoes more loudly than a full one."
Anton Chekhov on cultured people (1886)

(Source: old-glory)

Mar 30 '14
natskep:

Visit http://natskep.com - Me in a nutshell. Scientific skepticism at its best! #quoteoftheday #science #richarddawkins

natskep:

Visit http://natskep.com - Me in a nutshell. Scientific skepticism at its best! #quoteoftheday #science #richarddawkins